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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
: well, i'm based in irving, texas, at the university of dallas, where i'm a professor of politics. c-span: is that a full-time job still? >> guest: right. yes. c-span: and when did you--early on in your life, or maybe it wasn't early on--start thinking about things like the constitution or the declaration of independence or the founding fathers? >> guest: well, it took me a while to get there. i was a student in the '60s and '70s of leo strauss and some of strauss' students out in claremont; actually, originally, a student of allan bloom's at cornell, then i went out to claremont. and originally, i was really focused on the study of obscure texts in the history of political philosophy written by dead white males like plato and cicero and people like that. and my first book, in fact, was an interpretation of plato's apology of socrates. but it really wasn't until the '80s that i got interested in a serious way in american politics and i used my knowledge of the history of philosophy to help to understand the principles of this country. and i think it really did help, as a matter of fa
of wild bees, distant stars, and frontier pioneers. the dallas morning news reported that the audience listened to the poet's words, quote, "with the strictist attention with applause." now, the next speaker, the chief justice of texas spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] now, in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] again, there's no need to panic or run for the exits. i gave up that plan when i couldn't find suitable words that rimed with latin terms. [laughter] president lovitt spoke third and delivered the speech titled "the meaning of the new stietion." his essay is, in fact, a truly magnificent scholarly work with a thoughtful and prophetic vision on what the institution would become. i want to focus on one point he made observing a great challenge on any institution is, quote, to plan at one and the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years. now at the century mark, it's safe to say that president lovitt and six presidents who followed him met the
of the others. every member, hamilton said it makes it immune to entry. dallas' argument in the federalist. nobody forward a little bit into the first federal election. remember, you vote for two members. each has the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and p
the first five minutes of an episode of" dallas" from 19788 which was hottest show from reality tv. who shot j.r. show, listeners or viewers will remember. it is amazing. ever can catch it on tv fascinating to watch because it is so, the relationship between the producers and the writers and the audience is so condescending. there is this very palpable sense that the creators of the show just think that the audience can't possibly understand who these characters are and they spend two minutes kind of going, these two people are brothers. did everybody get that? whereas show today, not just that edited more quickly, that they're able to kind of go much faster and challenge the audience. look at a show like, "lost" which was insanely complicated. that show would have never gotten anywhere near national television in 1977 or '78. so there is tolerance for complexity and, and being challenged that the audience has now that we didn't have when i was growing up. >> host: steven johnson is our guest on "in depth". bill in oklahoma, you are first up today. please go ahead with your question or comme
for the ceremony. this is drawn from an indian legend invokes wild bees, stars, and frontier pioneers. "the dallas morning news" reported the audience listened with the strictist attention with frequent applause. now, the next speaker, the chief justice spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] there's no need to panic or run for the exits i gave up the plan and couldn't think of words that rhymed with lat latin legal terms. [laughter] the essay is, in fact, a truly magnificently scholarly work presents thoughtful and prophetic vision of what the rice institution would become. i want to focus on one point made. he observedded the great challenge in creating any constitution is, quote, "to plan at one in the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years." we're now at the century mark, and it's safe to say president lovitt and the six presidents who followed him met his challenge. rice's academic programs ranging from space, science, a
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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